Frame Packaging: Get Your Contents Safely to Your Customer

According to recent figures released by the UK government, over 50% of consumers shop online some or all the time. It’s a trend that looks set to continue. For online businesses, this is excellent news, as long as they can attract those consumers and then turn them into loyal customers. 

One of the best ways to do this is to make sure that the products they sell offer value for money. Another is to make sure that these goods arrive at their destination undamaged. For this to happen, a business needs to use the right packaging for their products, especially if those products are fragile. 

There are few things more fragile than frames, whether these contain a piece of art or have a future displaying treasured family photos. Depending on their size and construction, the frames themselves can be thin (making them easily breakable). Plus, the glass itself can shatter if not adequately protected. 

What, though, is the best way to package a frame? Here, we look at the frame packaging steps to take to make sure frames are packaged properly so that they arrive at their destination damage-free.

Supplies

The first thing any business needs to do is to make sure they have the right types of frame packaging for the items they want to ship. This means boxes that are the right size – they need to fit around the frames securely. It also means supplies to package up the frame itself. These include packaging tape, labels, recycled brown packing paper and other eco-friendly packaging options such as cardboard, paper, shredded paper or even popcorn. 

Using The Right Sized Box

While it might be tempting to try and save money by ordering boxes in bulk then making them fit the frame, this isn’t a good idea. Choosing a box that’s too big, for example, and filling it full of additional packaging such as Styrofoam peanuts, can see it shift in transit. As a result, it could end up damaged, meaning a refund or returned order. Furthermore, customers now prioritise green packaging solutions and do not want to see wasteful unrecyclable products such as Styrofoam

It is much better to find boxes that fit the frames, even if this means ordering smaller quantities. The good news here is that are box manufacturers who specialise in boxes designed for shipping frames. Alternatively, you can opt for a Box on Demand service which creates the right-sized box for every item you want to ship. You can also break down an existing box and resize it for the frame if specialist packaging isn’t available. 

Protecting Glass

Most frames include a glass sheet that protects the contents once it’s on the wall. To protect the glass until it’s ready for hanging, use masking tape to place an X across it. This can stop it from moving during shipping. Plus, if it does shatter, it stops it breaking into smaller pieces.

Protecting Artwork

Where artwork isn’t covered by glass it still needs protection from damage. The best way to do this is to use a wrap around the frame and over (but not touching) the art.  Commercial wrapping (often made from paper or plastic) is available for shipping purposes. It may be called pallet wrap. You can also find plastic-alternative wrapping that is usually made from corn starch if you want your packaging to be green.

Additional Packaging

It’s best to use the right size frame packaging. However, if the box isn’t an exact fit, you may need to provide extra protection. Use at least two layers of additional packaging. Wrap one layer around the frame lengthwise and one around the frame width-wise. This means it’s less likely to shift in transit. Something else worth thinking about are corner protectors, which should help hold the frame securely in place.

Check For Movement

Before sealing up the box, it’s a good idea to test the package for shipment. However, once a company has a process for frame packaging that works, this won’t be needed. Close the box and lift it, lay it flat and then turn it over. Then reopen the box to check whether there has been any movement. If there isn’t, it’s good to go. If there is, adjust the packaging to reduce the risk of damage to the frame. 

Final Packaging

Seal frame packaging securely before shipping it (the same as any other packaging). Make sure to close all seams, covering them with packing tape. It’s important to avoid any gaps or openings. Add a label that clearly shows the name and address of the recipient. Include any shipping instructions on the label.  Most important of these is marking the package FRAGILE. Use FRAGILE stickers (rather than writing the word) to look professional. Place them in key locations where they will be easily seen. 



Ribble Packaging Ltd http://ribble-pack.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Ribble-logo-final.png
Greengate Street, Oldham Lancashire OL4 1DF United Kingdom
Customer Services info@ribble-pack.co.uk +441612849000
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